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Irrigation

Find everything you need for an irrigation project right here. We have irrigation supplies across all categories, including spray irrigation, drip irrigation, controllers, sensors, solenoid valves, sprinklers and more.

We stock Hunter, Rain Bird, Netafim, Irritrol, Toro, Orbit, only the biggest and best irrigation brands in the world. Plus, for when you need that extra little bit of assistance we have irrigation help articles & our Design Department.

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Irrigation

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Showing 1–15 of 389 results

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    $485.00

    $1194.96
    Hunter Pro-HC (Hydrawise) 6 Zone Outdoor Wi-Fi Irrigation Controller
    $485.00$1,060.00
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  • From
    $26.53

    $36.53
    100mm Hunter PGP Ultra Pop-Up Gear Drive (pack of 5 + key)
    $26.53$340.00
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    $176.00

    $353.66
    Hunter NODE-100 1 Zone DC Battery Controller (inc Valve)
    $176.00$1,710.17
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    $141.96

    $283.27
    Hunter X-Core 4 Zone Outdoor Controller
    $141.96$272.01
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    $160.64

    $302.38
    Orbit 4 Zone Automatic Watering Kit (inc. 2 Valves)
    $36.47$160.64
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    $38.60

    $62.11
    Irritrol (Richdel) 205 Solenoid Valve 25mm (inc. Flow Cont.)
    $38.60$694.68
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    $8.55
    Spray Irrigation
    $3.50$191.96
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    $450.00

    $1211.18
    Hunter HPC (Hydrawise) 4 to 23 Zone Modular Controller
    $88.99$1,009.43
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    $41.95

    46% off
    Pressure Regulating Valves
    $41.95$61.87
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    $35.36

    $85.14
    Irritrol (Richdel) 2400 Solenoid Valve 25mm
    $35.36$490.62
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    $341.86

    $675.82
    Irrigation Bundles
    $341.86$735.67
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    $53.50

    42% off
    50m x Netafim Techline AS (13mm)(30cm Spacing)(3lph)
    $53.50$231.44
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  • From
    $28.63

    $47.59
    Hunter PGV Solenoid Valve 25mm
    $28.30$696.34
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    $206.04

    $445.01
    Rainbird RC2 8 Station Wi-Fi Irrigation Controller
    $206.04
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  • From
    $18.92

    $36.86
    Hunter SRM Pop-Up Gear Drive Sprinklers
    $18.92$378.45
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Irrigation FAQs

What’s the best type of sprinkler for my garden?

There’s no best type of sprinkler, just better sprinklers for different applications. Gear Drives are better for large areas, over 5m. Pop-Ups are ideal for 1.5-5m & Micro sprays are excellent for anything under that.

What type of nozzles should I use?

The type of nozzle all depends on how far you need to spray, each nozzle is specified by the radius it sprays & the spray arc it provides (0-360 degrees). Aim to spray to the base of the next closest sprinkler for even watering. For more information on planning, check out our Product Guides.

How many sprinklers can I have on a single irrigation zone?

Each sprinkler & nozzle will push out water at different rates, but the key factor is the flow rate of your water supply. Work that out with a simple timed bucket test. From there, you can work out how much water each sprinkler you’re looking at uses & work within your flow limit. For more information, check our Product Guides.

Should I flush my watering system before running it?

As you install a system, it’s almost inevitable that small fragments of dirt will get into the pipe, for this reason you should always flush out the system before running it the first time. This can be done by leaving an open end at the farthest point of each irrigation zone & operating the zone for 15 or so seconds to flush it out. Then plug it up & you’re good to go! This can also be said for any other times dirt may have gotten into the system (eg: further irrigation repairs or a mains water supply fault).

Can I have drip tube & sprinklers on the same irrigation zone?

We definitely don’t recommend it. Typically, drip tube will deliver the water at a far slower rate that sprays. Because of this, if you were to have both on the same zone, the areas with drip would be left far drier than the areas with sprinkler coverage. If you do want to water some areas with drip & some with sprinklers, it can be done, but each will just need to be run on their own separate irrigation zones.

How far apart should I position my sprinklers from each other?

Firstly, each sprinkler &/or nozzle has a specified spray radius. Secondly, sprinklers are typically designed to deliver more water at their base & progressively less the further away you get. For this reason, you want to position sprinklers so they spray to hit the base of the next sprinkler. Of course this isn’t possible all the time so in those cases, aim to spray at least 80% of the way. By doing this you will guarantee even water across your lawn or garden.

Do I need a filter on my irrigation system?

Even on a typical domestic system running on mains water a filter is still a good idea. In the event of a water main fault where rubbish does find it’s way down the line, a filter will protect the system from blockage and or failure. On systems operating off recycled water, like from a tank, a screen filter is mandatory. Debris like silt & dirt from recycled water is the most common cause of blockages of failures in irrigation systems.

Why do my irrigation parts keep blowing apart?

The main cause of blowout is pressure. Whether it’s poly fittings, PVC fittings or timers, whatever the component, if the pressure is too high for what it’s designed for, kaboom! Simply solve the problem with a pressure reducer & make it a brass one if it’s on your water supply.

What’s the best type of sprinkler for my garden?

There’s no best type of sprinkler, just better sprinklers for different applications. Gear Drives are better for large areas, over 5m. Pop-Ups are ideal for 1.5-5m & Micro sprays are excellent for anything under that.

Why would I use drip tube instead of sprays?

Drip tube is excellent in areas of rich dense soil where water spreads nicely throughout. Installed under mulch, the water is delivered with minimal evaporation & wastage, going direct to the root ball.

Can I just punch extra holes into my drip tube?

No, drip tube isn’t simply holes punched into poly pipe. Inside each hole is an intricate dripper which delivers that water nice and evenly. Punching a hole will simply create an uncontrolled leak!

How many sprinklers can I have on a single irrigation zone?

Each sprinkler & nozzle will push out water at different rates, but the key factor is the flow rate of your water supply. Work that out with a simple timed bucket test. From there, you can work out how much water each sprinkler you’re looking at uses & work within your flow limit. For more information, check our Product Guides.

Should I flush my watering system before running it?

As you install a system, it’s almost inevitable that small fragments of dirt will get into the pipe, for this reason you should always flush out the system before running it the first time. This can be done by leaving an open end at the farthest point of each irrigation zone & operating the zone for 15 or so seconds to flush it out. Then plug it up & you’re good to go! This can also be said for any other times dirt may have gotten into the system (eg: further irrigation repairs or a mains water supply fault).

Can I have drip tube & sprinklers on the same irrigation zone?

We definitely don’t recommend it. Typically, drip tube will deliver the water at a far slower rate that sprays. Because of this, if you were to have both on the same zone, the areas with drip would be left far drier than the areas with sprinkler coverage. If you do want to water some areas with drip & some with sprinklers, it can be done, but each will just need to be run on their own separate irrigation zones.

Do I need a filter on my irrigation system?

Even on a typical domestic system running on mains water a filter is still a good idea. In the event of a water main fault where rubbish does find it’s way down the line, a filter will protect the system from blockage and or failure. On systems operating off recycled water, like from a tank, a screen filter is mandatory. Debris like silt & dirt from recycled water is the most common cause of blockages of failures in irrigation systems.

What’s the best type of sprinkler for my garden?

There’s no best type of sprinkler, just better sprinklers for different applications. Gear Drives are better for large areas, over 5m. Pop-Ups are ideal for 1.5-5m & Micro sprays are excellent for anything under that.

I have pot plants on a deck, how do I water them?

You can simply use Micro Drippers or Micro Drip Tube, but your challenge is delivering the water to the pot. We suggest you run Poly Pipe as close as you can & then thin Micro Tube as hidden from view as possible up into the pot.

How many sprinklers can I have on a single irrigation zone?

Each sprinkler & nozzle will push out water at different rates, but the key factor is the flow rate of your water supply. Work that out with a simple timed bucket test. From there, you can work out how much water each sprinkler you’re looking at uses & work within your flow limit. For more information, check our Product Guides.

Should I flush my watering system before running it?

As you install a system, it’s almost inevitable that small fragments of dirt will get into the pipe, for this reason you should always flush out the system before running it the first time. This can be done by leaving an open end at the farthest point of each irrigation zone & operating the zone for 15 or so seconds to flush it out. Then plug it up & you’re good to go! This can also be said for any other times dirt may have gotten into the system (eg: further irrigation repairs or a mains water supply fault).

Can I have drip tube & sprinklers on the same irrigation zone?

We definitely don’t recommend it. Typically, drip tube will deliver the water at a far slower rate that sprays. Because of this, if you were to have both on the same zone, the areas with drip would be left far drier than the areas with sprinkler coverage. If you do want to water some areas with drip & some with sprinklers, it can be done, but each will just need to be run on their own separate irrigation zones.

Can I mix micro sprays and micro drippers on the same zone?

Due to the different flow rates or each type, it’s often not recommended. A micro spray will typically provide water at 1-2lpm, where as a fixed micro dripper will provide far less, at 2-8lph. However, there are adjustable drippers which can provide higher flows & there are applications where you may want less flow, like pots or native planting.

What is the maximum number of micro sprays or drippers on a single irrigation zone?

Each spray & dripper provides water at different rates, but the key factor is the flow rate of your water supply. Work that out with a simple timed bucket test. From there, you can work out how much water each sprinkler you’re looking at uses & work within your flow limit. For more information, check our Product Guides.

How far apart should I position my sprinklers from each other?

Firstly, each sprinkler &/or nozzle has a specified spray radius. Secondly, sprinklers are typically designed to deliver more water at their base & progressively less the further away you get. For this reason, you want to position sprinklers so they spray to hit the base of the next sprinkler. Of course this isn’t possible all the time so in those cases, aim to spray at least 80% of the way. By doing this you will guarantee even water across your lawn or garden.

My micro sprays sometimes block up, what can I do?

Because of their small outlets, micro sprays can block from time to time. Fixing individual sprays can be as simple as unscrewing them & simply blowing the blockage back out. To avoid repeat blockages we recommend installing a simple inline filter.

Do I need a filter on my irrigation system?

Even on a typical domestic system running on mains water a filter is still a good idea. In the event of a water main fault where rubbish does find it’s way down the line, a filter will protect the system from blockage and or failure. On systems operating off recycled water, like from a tank, a screen filter is mandatory. Debris like silt & dirt from recycled water is the most common cause of blockages of failures in irrigation systems.

Can I get away with placing my indoor controller outside?

In rare applications, like on a wall under a well covered patio where the space is 100% dry all the time & not exposed to the sun, an indoor controller will continue to operate without issue. But if you’re not sure, we recommend installing an outdoor model. If something does go wrong with your controller due to water damage or the LCD screen failing from sun exposure, the warranty is voided so it’s not worth the risk.

Can I run my system manually from the controller?

Yes, irrigation controllers typically have a manual function, this will allow you to both operate all zones, or each one individually as you please.

Will an irrigation controller operate all zones at once, or one at a time?

Domestic irrigation controllers will always operate zones one at a time. Even if you try to operate 2 to come on at the same time, the controller will automatically delay the operation of the second zone until after the first zone has finished running.

Do I need a rain sensor?

In some states a rain sensor is mandatory, but regardless it’s something you should include in your irrigation system. Having your system turn on in the middle of a day of rain is not only embarrassing, it’s a terrible waste of water & the overwatering is bad for your garden!

What’s the best type of sprinkler for my garden?

There’s no best type of sprinkler, just better sprinklers for different applications. Gear Drives are better for large areas, over 5m. Pop-Ups are ideal for 1.5-5m & Micro sprays are excellent for anything under that.

Do I need a filter on my irrigation system?

Even on a typical domestic system running on mains water a filter is still a good idea. In the event of a water main fault where rubbish does find it’s way down the line, a filter will protect the system from blockage and or failure. On systems operating off recycled water, like from a tank, a screen filter is mandatory. Debris like silt & dirt from recycled water is the most common cause of blockages of failures in irrigation systems.

How do I adjust my gear drive sprinklers?

Most gear drives adjust the same way: Alter the spray radius by changing the nozzle, most sprinklers come with a nozzle rack. And, alter the spray radius using a gear drive adjustment tool or screw driver. Gear drive adjustment tools or spanners make adjusting much easier with the added function of being able to lift the sprinkler riser for simple adjustment.

Do I need to use teflon tape? How much do I need to use?

Whenever you’re connecting two threaded fittings, teflon is required. The only exception is whenever either fitting has an O-ring, in this case, do not apply teflon as it may cause the O-ring to not seal correctly. The amount of teflon you apply depends on the application. In any constant pressure applications you look at up to wrapping around the thread up to 20 times, whereas in any non-constant pressure applications, like on irrigation risers, 2 or 3 times around the thread is enough.

Do I need to bury my drip tube?

Unless a drip tube is designed for use under ground, with anti-root intrusion technology, it’s should not be buried under soil. However, performs at its best when installed under mulch where the water is delivered with minimal evaporation.

What type of pipe should I use on my irrigation system?

The type of pipe you use depends on the water pressure of the application. For example, in any application under constant mains pressure like before your Irrigation Valves, you’ll need pipe that can cope. This rules out Low Density Poly Pipe & you’ll need to use something like Class 12 PVC or Metric Poly Pipe, these typically have a rating of Class 12, or PN12 which translates to being able to cope with 1200kPa. For irrigation lines after the valves in most domestic applications, Low Density Poly Pipe is ideal. In this situation, the operating pressure is much lower because the water is able to escape out of the operating sprinklers or drip tube & once the valves shut off, there is no static pressure build up.

What size pipe do I need to use?

Pipe sizing is all about reducing friction loss & allowing maximum flow to all points of your garden. There are a number of variables to consider, but in most domestic applications, 19mm Poly Pipe is the common choice. In larger areas, where you may have to run pipe 30-40m to the start of an irrigation zone, or zones with large sprinklers with high flow requirements, you may want to consider upping your pipe size to 25mm of more boost that flow output.

Do I need to use teflon tape? How much do I need to use?

Whenever you’re connecting two threaded fittings, teflon is required. The only exception is whenever either fitting has an O-ring, in this case, do not apply teflon as it may cause the O-ring to not seal correctly. The amount of teflon you apply depends on the application. In any constant pressure applications you look at up to wrapping around the thread up to 20 times, whereas in any non-constant pressure applications, like on irrigation risers, 2 or 3 times around the thread is enough.

How long do I need to run my system for?

There’s no single answer for any system because of a range of factors. So work with trial and error. If you’ve got no idea, maybe start at 5-10 mins. Then think about watering days depending on the time of year, if it’s summer, everyday, but winter maybe once a week.

What is a solenoid valve?

A solenoid valve is the automatic tap that controls that flow of water to an irrigation zone. Solenoid Valves are automatically operated by an irrigation controller which is programmed to tell the solenoid valve when to open & close.

How many solenoid valves should I use?

The number of solenoid valves you use depends on the size of your garden & the flow output of your water supply. The number of litres per minute that are available will determine the number of sprinklers or drippers you can operate at any one time. Once your garden is divided up into each section using that information, you’ll need one solenoid valve to operate each one individually.

What is a master valve, and do I need one?

A master valve is installed upstream of the solenoid valves being used to control each irrigation zone. They’re not mandatory, but they are a good idea as installing one increases the life-span of each valve by protect the valves downstream from the constant pressure that would otherwise be applied. The way it works is, every time a zone is programmed to come on the master valve also switches on, providing the flow, but when all the zones are off, the master valve closes, holding back the flow & pressure of the water supply. Simply, it’s kind of like an irrigation insurance policy.

Can I just use electrical tape on my cable joins?

Being exposed to the weather, water damage will occur any where water can get in. Electrical tape isn’t quite water tight & over time water will creep into the circuit & create havoc & void all warranties. For this reason you should always use waterproof cable joins like heat shrinks.

My solenoid is staying on, how can I fix it?

Nearly all of the time, a solenoid valve staying open is caused by debris caught in the diaphragm. Even the finest debris can cause the valve not to seal shut, causing a constant leak. Other cause can be: Not enough flow because the irrigation zone is too small or, not enough pressure, the valve needs the pressure to seal shut.

Can I use my solenoid valves off a gravity feed?

Unless your tank located is upwards of 20m above your valves, gravity feed will not provide enough pressure for your valves to reliably open & close. It is not recommended.

Can I just use electrical tape on my cable joins?

Being exposed to the weather, water damage will occur any where water can get in. Electrical tape isn’t quite water tight & over time water will creep into the circuit & create havoc & void all warranties. For this reason you should always use waterproof cable joins like heat shrinks.

Do I need to use teflon tape? How much do I need to use?

Whenever you’re connecting two threaded fittings, teflon is required. The only exception is whenever either fitting has an O-ring, in this case, do not apply teflon as it may cause the O-ring to not seal correctly. The amount of teflon you apply depends on the application. In any constant pressure applications you look at up to wrapping around the thread up to 20 times, whereas in any non-constant pressure applications, like on irrigation risers, 2 or 3 times around the thread is enough.

I can’t find my solenoids & my system is broken, what do I do?

Unfortunately, this is one of the hardest tasks in irrigation. First, look in the obvious spots which are near you water connection & any garden taps. Often over time solenoid valves can get buried, so it can be useful to use a stick or long screwdriver to poke prospective areas until you feel that hard tap of the valve box (if there is one). Beyond that, it’s time to consider solenoid valve seeking equipment or calling a serviceman. This can all be avoided of course by installing valves in single locations on a manifold close to a tap & at a depth not likely to get covered over time.

Do I need a plumber to install or fix my system?

No, unless you’re tapping into your water supply, a plumber isn’t required. Most domestic irrigation systems can be installed by anyone half handy.

Are there any safety standards my irrigation system must meet?

The main safety concern is regarding the water supply. To avoid contamination of the mains water upstream, in most municipalities, a Dual Check Valve is required at the water connection.

Do I need a rain sensor?

In some states a rain sensor is mandatory, but regardless it’s something you should include in your irrigation system. Having your system turn on in the middle of a day of rain is not only embarrassing, it’s a terrible waste of water & the overwatering is bad for your garden!

Do I need a filter on my irrigation system?

Even on a typical domestic system running on mains water a filter is still a good idea. In the event of a water main fault where rubbish does find it’s way down the line, a filter will protect the system from blockage and or failure. On systems operating off recycled water, like from a tank, a screen filter is mandatory. Debris like silt & dirt from recycled water is the most common cause of blockages of failures in irrigation systems.

How do you connect garden sprinklers to the tap?

Using standard garden hose. The tap will require a tap adaptor which allow you to click in standard garden hose. The other end of the garden hose will click into the garden sprinkler.

What’s the best type of sprinkler for my garden?

There’s no best type of sprinkler, just better sprinklers for different applications. Gear Drives are better for large areas, over 5m. Pop-Ups are ideal for 1.5-5m & Micro sprays are excellent for anything under that.

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